Our Success Stories

Objective 2 of the Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) intends to foster the integration of a greater number of smallholder producers in performing and remunerative value-chains, by developing and implementing public private alliances that provide smallholder farmers with knowledge in cocoa management, as well as access to markets and services that secure higher prices for their produce.

The PPAP has developed a model approach that facilitates the realisation of the 3 project objectives. Our partners for Objective 2 are building productive partnerships in the cocoa producing provinces, through a competitive grants scheme. There have been 3 Calls for Proposals:

  • Call 1 commenced in the Islands Region in January 2012
  • Call 2 commenced in the Islands Region in September 2012
  • Call 3 commenced in the Momase Region in August 2014
  • Up-scaling Calls 1 and 2 commenced in the Islands Region in November 2015

Some of our success stories for Objective 2 are presented below.  More information is displayed in the sidebar.


Reviving cocoa is reviving human life (1)

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver have been working with the World Bank’s Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) and its industry partner – NGIP-Agmark – to promote their motto “Reviving cocoa is reviving human life”. From humble beginnings, this small “cluster group” of smallholder cocoa farmers in the Gazelle District of East New Britain Province now reaches out to 642 registered farmers from 3 Districts in 2 Provinces through the provision of high-quality, face-to-face services that are both demand driven and affordable.

Founding brothers

Tonit Alex – Shadowes Founder – says Shadowes Cocoa Reviver aims to provide ongoing training and support services to cocoa famers that ensure cocoa production and quality.

The cocoa revival ‘concept’ took shape in 2012, when 3 brothers – John Kola, Tonit Alex and Kola Nicholas – attended a training course for cocoa farmers at NGIP-Agmark’s Farmer Training Centre located at the nearby Tokiala Plantation in the Gazelle District of East New Britain Province. This intensive, 1-week training session demonstrated best practices for managing cocoa blocks, and inspired the 3 brothers to set-up a nursery that would supply local farmers with high quality cocoa seedlings at affordable prices. Being a local facility, the brothers also expected the nursery to minimise transport costs and seedling mortality, as well as encourage more local farmers to plant cocoa on their land. Above all, the 3 brothers were hoping their local nursery would revive the cocoa industry within Kabaira Ward (Gazelle District, East New Britain Province), which would then revive the deteriorating livelihoods of their fellow ward members following the cocoa pod borer (CPB) outbreak in 2006.

Tonit Alex – Shadowes Secretary and Vunairima Primary School Teacher – says Shadowes Cocoa Reviver aims to provide ongoing training and support services to cocoa famers that ensure cocoa production and quality:

“Dispela Shadowes Cocoa Revival mitriplela brata ibin statim yet. Ol papa blo mipela yet em ol lain blo planim kakao. Olsem na kakao em istap lo sistem blo mipela. Taim CPB ikam insait na bagarapim kakao blo mipela, mipela ino giv up. Mitripela brata ibin kamapim Shadowes Cocoa Revival wantaim sapot blo PPAP na Agmark, na John Kola ibin wok olsem lid treina blo mipela. Aim blo mipela, mipela ilaikim olsem mipela imas stap wantaim fama inap long taim blo fementim na salim kakao, long kamapim na promoutim kualiti stret blong kakao”.

Productive partnership

Toigen and his family look after “every pod, every tree, every week” in their cocoa block at Ratongor Ward in the Livuan-Reimber LLG of Gazelle District (East New Britain Province).

In order to realise their dream for Kabaira Ward, the 3 brothers decided to collaborate with the Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) and their industry partner: NGIP-Agmark. The 3 brothers were already well-known to NGIP-Agmark as effective lead farmers within their local community, having teamed-up with the company’s commercial agronomist and field staff at the nearby Tokiala Plantation.

As the largest exporter of PNG cocoa, NGIP-Agmark has been instrumental in ensuring maximum value is returned to smallholder producers; working through its local network of branches, commercial agronomists and farmer groups. The PPAP has joined-forces with NGIP-Agmark and other cocoa exporters to improve the integration of smallholder farmers in the cocoa value chain through the provision of critical local infrastructure and services.

NGIP-Agmark’s Assistant (PPAP) Project Manager – Ishmael Gar – is confident the PPAP’s partnership building approach is helping smallholders to manage their cocoa blocks for long-term benefits:

“Cocoa farmers these days need to be business-minded. The PPAP trainings have helped farmers with business planning, record keeping, and adopting best practices for managing their cocoa blocks. We encourage farmers to control the cocoa pod borer and other pests by attending to ‘EVERY POD, EVERY TREE, EVERY WEEK’; using these 5 simple steps in cocoa management.
1. Weekly harvesting.
2. Pod waste burial
3. Regular pruning
4. Target Spraying
5. Shade Reduction”

Shared objectives

Tande Rokhus (Board Chairman) and John Potol (Ward Member) introducing Shadowes Cocoa Reviver which is registered with the Investment Promotion Authority (IPA) as an agricultural operation with 5 long-term development objectives.

The Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) has helped the 3 brothers from Kabiara Ward in Gazelle District to realise their dream; working through NGIP-Agmark’s “business to business” network comprising commercial agronomists, cocoa buying points and input supplies. Shadowes Cocoa Reviver is now registered with the Investment Promotion Authority (IPA) as an agricultural operation with the following long-term development objectives:

  1. To establish a network with local leaders for delivering cocoa seedlings.
  2. To establish and sustain cocoa production within our communities, wards, districts and province.
  3. To raise the living standard of people within our rural communities.
  4. To assist our members as parents with the cash incomes needed for school fees, customary obligations and family requirements.
  5. To assist our members as local people in their Church contributions.

John Potol – Member for Kabaira Ward – says that cocoa production in Kabaira Ward is now returning to normal after the CPB epidemic, thanks to the productive partnership between Shadowes Cocoa Reviver, PPAP and NGIP-Agmark.

“Before the CPB, living with cocoa was normal for the families within my ward. Cocoa provided cash for basic household needs such as salt, sugar, school fees, materials for building houses, and church contributions. Since then my ward members have faced a very hard life because of the destruction of the CPB. Shadowes is now helping to bring things back to normal with help from PPAP and NGIP-Agmark. My ward members have now learnt how to manage the CPB in their cocoa blocks using the best available techniques”.

Dedicated team

Nicholas Vinau with an 18-month old hybrid cocoa clone supplied by his local satellite nursery at Mandress in the Inland Baining LLG of Gazelle District (East New Britain Province).

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver comprises a network of dedicated individuals working together to realise their shared objectives. This includes the following key personnel at the Kabaira Base:

  • 4 Executive members with qualifications in education and training.
  • 1 Forester with diploma in forestry.
  • 1 Catechist from the Kabaira Parish.
  • 4 trainers with training qualifications in best practice cocoa management.
  • 8 trainers with training qualifications in cross-cutting issues such as governance and financial literacy.
  • 4 carpenters with technical qualifications in carpentry and joinery.

Baduk Paul is Secretary for the Shadowes Board of Directors, and looks after the group’s administration activities at the Kabaira Base. Baduk has also been trained in cocoa block management, sustainable livelihoods & decision making, basic record keeping & book keeping, low cost bud grafting and HIV/Aids awareness.

“Initially Shadowes focused on “up-scaling” cocoa production within Kabaira Ward using the Training Resource Centre, Nursery, and Budwood Garden set-up with help from PPAP and Agmark. But due to the geographical hardships faced by farmers inland, we could not get transportation from the base into the bush. So Shadowes decided to set up satellite nurseries to make seedlings more accessible and affordable for inland farmers. “Out-scaling” using local resources was the brain-child of the Shadowes Team Members. We promote our services using Facebook, and are getting many requests from farmers”.

Membership services

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver currently has 642 members from 3 Districts in 2 Provinces. There are over 30 “satellite farmer groups” with 15-100 members in each group.

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver currently has 642 members from 3 Districts in 2 Provinces. There are over 30 “satellite groups” with 15-100 members in each group. Each group member must pay a one-time registration fee of 200 Kina. The registration fee covers the following services:

  • Cocoas seedlings: All members either receive free hybrid cocoa clones from the Shadowes Base Nursery (members are encouraged to bring their own polybags) or free bud-sticks from the Shadowes Budwood Garden (for grafting onto local stock at their local satellite nursery). Non-members can also purchase cocoa seedlings at competitive prices.
  • Training and mentoring: All members receive free training services which includes best practice cocoa management topics such as lining, planting, ring weeding, tipping, formation, pruning, chemical use, harvesting, cocoa varieties, and cocoa processing. Members are also invited to attend monthly meetings at the Shadowes Training Resource Centre to provide feedback on their cocoa production activities, as well as discuss any training needs. For example, if a satellite farmers group needs pruning assistance, a visit will be arranged for a Shadowes Trainer to give a pruning demonstration on 50% of their cocoa trees. The trainer will then arrange a follow-up visit to see how well the farmers have pruned the other 50% of their cocoa trees.
  • Cocoa buying point: All members can sell their wet beans to the Shadowes Buying Point at the Kabaira Base. The beans are then processed into dry beans at the Shadowes Fermentary for sale to NGIP-Agmark under the group’s fermentary licence number. Members are encouraged to sell their dry beans directly to the NGIP-Agmark Buying Point at Kerevat. However, if a farmer is in urgent need of cash, then Shadowes will buy his/her dry beans for re-sale later to NGIP-Agmark.

Getting ready to reap the benefits from certified cocoa production

Noel Sawai produces high-yield CPB tolerant cocoa clones at the Barum nursery in Madang Province

Leading cocoa exporter Outspan PNG Limited – a subsidiary of Olam International Limited – has been in the country since the 2000.  Olam International is a fully integrated cocoa business: an originator of cocoa beans, a globally leading cocoa processor and a world supplier of cocoa beans and cocoa products such as cocoa powder, cocoa mass, and cocoa butter. Outspan PNG has partnered with the World Bank’s Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP).

“Currently in East New Britain we work with 1500 farmers in up-scaling and we also lead a group of 2500 farmers in East Sepik and Madang” says Basavaraj Mashetty (Operations Manager). “Long term objectives are to plant more trees and rejuvenate old trees with new high-yield CPB tolerant clones. Also to increase per hectare yield so that farmers can grow more cocoa and improve their livelihoods”.

“We are the only Rainforest Alliance certified exporter in PNG.  The Rainforest Alliance certified seal assures consumers that the product they are purchasing has been grown and harvested using environmentally and socially responsible practices.  Rainforest Alliance’s sustainable agricultural standard contributes to the improvement of the livelihoods of farmers, workers and their families. Furthermore, with lots of pressure on global warming, all chocolate manufacturers are looking to source cocoa from sustainable supply chains. Our aim is to offer our customers consistent quality beans grown in sustainable environments”.

Our PNG sustainability initiatives are designed to work with farmers to help them understand PNG cocoa better as well as how they can improve yield and quality to add value and improve their livelihoods. We have our own long term sustainability programs in Sepik and Madang; working with 3000 certified farmers. Portions of our profit margins are committed to sustainable programs every year. Through these programs farmers get support to improve their cocoa yields through best practice management practices.

“We keep the farmers in these networks motivated through the annual payment of premiums. With these certifications we not only offer more consistent quality cocoa beans but also support the future market prices. I’m sure our farmers in these programs will really reap the benefits when their cocoa production goes up”.

Source: The National, 4 January 2018


Cocoa trees flowering again

Hosea Turbarat – Kairak Vudal Resource Training Centre Manager – at his model cocoa block in East New Britain Province.

Thanks to the PPAP, farmers in the region have planted their hybrid clone seedlings either one full or half hectare. Many of the trees are now just over two years old and have already bearings. Those who have planted in late 2012 to early 2014 are happy to see their cocoa trees flowering and bearing cherelles or mature pods.

A farmer at Radingi Ward in the Inland Baining LLG jumped and shouted in joy when he harvested one kilogram of wet cocoa bean from his farm and sold it to a nearby wet cocoa bean dealer for K1.20. The farmer stated that he can sense the economic benefit of his hard work and commitment. He further heaped praise on the PPAP program and those who have assisted to bring the project to the area. During field visits by the Lead Trainer/Extension Manager, many farmers have commended the PPAP Programme saying that their cash flows will increase thus easing their financial burdens. One farmer at Warakindam Ward has already harvested one dry cocoa bean bag from his one hectare farm. This farmer was the first to plant and has earned PGK 430 from his cocoa sales.

Generally, farmers are very happy with the current PPAP Project and have participated well. Even those that have not yet planted are waiting patiently for their seedlings. The impact of the project has motivated a lot of people to work in their neglected cocoa blocks.

Testimony: Hosea Turburat, Kairak Integrated Agricultural Training Programme, University of Natural Resources and the Environment.


All weather access to hybrid clone seedlings

Henrica Tulia is 1 of 3 local women with budding and grafting skills employed at the Tagitagi nursery; supplying around 100,000 cocoa clones per year.

The partners – PNG Growers Association (lead partner) and Tagitagi & Warangoi Farmers’ Cooperative started building Hybrid Clone Nurseries at Toma and Warangoi in the Gazelle District of ENB Province after signing their partnership agreement with PPAP in June 2013.

Achieving a high rate (over 85%) of bud grafting success is critical to the success of a nursery producing hybrid clone seedlings. Their nursery staff were trained at NGIP-Agmark’s Tokiala Plantation; working in the partnership nurseries initially under supervision from Tokiala bud grafters while they developed their skills. When the first bud grafters were achieving a good success rate, they then trained more local people until the nursery was operating to capacity.

The nursery at Toma commenced operations in May 2014 and has been producing 10,000 seedlings per month, increasing up to 12,000 per month, for the partnership’s farmers since December 2014.  The Warangoi nursery started operations in July 2014 and has produces 7,000 seedlings per month, increasing up to 10,000 per month, since January 2015.

Recently, the Pamkubau Feeder Road located in Tagitagi No. 1 Ward has just been completed; providing all weather access to farmers’ cocoa blocks and the Hybrid Clone Nurseries at Toma and Warangoi. The nurseries currently serve more than 400 farmers and the road access improvement will allow easy access to the nursery by the farmers. The upgrading works was undertaken by a local contractor SPS Limited. The scope of works involves pavement and drainage rehabilitation to provide all weather access for farmers to the Clonal Nursery.  When all seedlings have been supplied to partnership farmers, the cooperatives will sell seedlings to other farmers, operating the nurseries as sustainable businesses and making the CPB tolerant clones more accessible to other cocoa farmers in the area.

Source: Post Courier, 4 September 2015


Integrating smallholder farmers in the cocoa value chain

The PPAP has assisted NGIP-Agmark to boost cocoa production and quality through improving smallholder farmer access to technical information, the market place, and input supplies.

As the largest exporter of PNG cocoa, NGIP-Agmark has been instrumental in ensuring maximum value is returned to smallholder producers. Smallholders have always supplied the majority of the cocoa that the company exports.

The Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) has assisted NGIP-Agmark to boost cocoa production volume and quality through improving smallholder farmer access to technical information, the market place, and input supplies. Working in collaboration with NGIP-Agmark’s local network of branches, commercial agronomists and farmer groups, over 600 hectares of unproductive cocoa blocks have been replanted with the latest poly-clonal hybrid cocoa varieties. After only 4 years, the first cocoa plantings have returned around 1.5 tonnes per hectare (9,600 kina/hectare). This is a significant improvement on the national average of just 0.3 tonnes per hectare per year.

NGIP-Agmark’s Assistant (PPAP) Project Manager – Ishmael Gar – is confident the PPAP approach is helping smallholders to manage their cocoa blocks for long-term benefits:

“Cocoa farmers these days need to be business-minded. The PPAP trainings have helped farmers with business planning, record keeping, and adopting best practices for managing their cocoa blocks. We encourage farmers to control the cocoa pod borer and other pests by attending to ‘EVERY POD, EVERY TREE, EVERY WEEK’; using these 5 simple steps in cocoa management.
1. Weekly harvesting.
2. Pod waste burial
3. Regular pruning
4. Target Spraying
5. Shade Reduction”

Local nurseries

Local nurseries allow smallholder farmers to quickly collect and plant high quality cocoa seedlings on their blocks.

The Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) design includes local nurseries and budwood gardens. Established with PPAP grant support, these local facilities allow smallholder farmers to quickly access, collect and plant high quality cocoa seedlings on their blocks. Local nurseries minimise transport costs and seedling mortality, as well as encourage farmers to plant cocoa. They also provide an opportunity for increasing smallholder participation in the cocoa value chain.

The PPAP partnership has helped NGIP-Agmark to set-up 6 new Nursery & Resource Centres (NRCs) and budwood gardens in strategic locations in Kokopo, Gazelle and Rabaul Districts. The locally managed nurseries supply smallholder farmers with hybrid cocoa clones which have been developed by the PNG Cocoa & Coconut Institute (CCI) for high yield, good bean quality and size, and some resistance to pests & diseases including cocoa pod borer (CPB). Together, these local nurseries have produced over 500,000 hybrid cocoa clones for local farmers.

Local fermentaries

John Sengi (3rd year tropical agriculture student) is currently working with NGIP-Agmark to monitor quality of cocoa produced in smallholder fermentaries.

Many smallholder farmer groups are keen to add value to their cocoa beans and earn extra income for their families. The Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) is helping to identify new technologies and practices that will improve the productivity and quality of smallholder cocoa fermentaries and dryers. For example, combination dryers are now being promoted as a cost-effective means of drying cocoa beans using solar power. The PPAP is also trialling 15” stainless steel kiln pipes as a means towards addressing the smoke taint issue in poorly maintained conventional cocoa dryers. With improved quality farmers should be able to attract premium cocoa prices.

John Sengi, a 3rd year tropical agriculture students at the University of Natural Resources & Environment (UNRE), is currently working with NGIP-Agmark to monitor the quality of cocoa being produced in smallholder fermentaries.

“My research project with NGIP-Agmark is examining the conversion rate of locally processed wet cocoa beans from 4 types of pod: red pod, yellow pod, green pod and CPB affected pods into final product. Data is being collected from 12 registered smallholder fermentaries within the Sinivit LLG area for comparison with centrally processed cocoa at Talina.”

To-date, the PPAP has helped NGIP-Agmark to repair 33 run-down cocoa dryers and assemble 7 new cocoa dryers. Together, these local operations have already produced 3,048 kilograms of dry beans (48 bags) for export markets.

Local tools and supplies

NGIP-Agmark operates “Didiman Stoas” nationwide in Wewak, Madang, Lae, Popondetta, Kimbe, Keravat, Warangoi, Rabaul and Kokopau.

NGIP-Agmark operates a nationwide network of “Didiman Stoas” in Wewak, Madang, Lae, Popondetta, Kimbe, Kerevat, Kokopo, Warangoi, Rabaul and Kokopau. These stores supply smallholder farmers with the tools and supplies they need to manage their cocoa blocks well. This includes:

  • Pruning equipment such as bow saws, pole pruners & secateurs), and
  • Pest & disease controlling equipment such as knapsack sprayers & a range of pesticides, along with the safety gear required for chemical use including gloves, respirators, overalls, gumboots, raincoats, and eye protectors.

August Samson is a Salesman at NGIP-Agmark’s Didiman Stoa in Warangoi, East New Britain Province. He works alongside his colleagues at the company’s wet and dry bean Cocoa Buying Point.

“Nambawan samting mipela isave salim em marasin blo cacao, blo stopim CPB. Na tu mipela isave salim ol tools blo cacao, wanwan samting blo kumu, ol baket blo wara na weelbaro.”

Local training and awareness

The PPAP has also helped NGIP-Agmark to establish 6 Nursery & Resource Centres (NRCs) that provide farmers with easy access to training, information and supplies.

NGIP-Agmark operates a “business to business” approach with smallholder farmers. This is achieved through the placement of qualified commercial agronomists (CAs) who support the cocoa business throughout its branch network. These agronomists go to the field with a wealth of experience in cocoa cultivation and community skills; they are able to “talk cocoa” with farmers.

The Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) has helped NGIP-Agmark to establish 6 Nursery & Resource Centres (NRCs) that provide farmers with local access to training, information and supplies. These local venues make it easy for the company’s CAs to deliver their ongoing training, awareness and support services for local farmers. The PPAP Farmer Training Program goes beyond the business of cocoa and agriculture, to include cross-cutting issues such as HIV/AIDS awareness, counselling and testing. The Training-of-Trainers (ToTs) is an essential component of the Farmer Training Program. To date, 3 commercial agronomists and over 100 lead farmers have attended ToT modules organised by NGIP-Agmark with PPAP funding support. All ToT modules are delivered by qualified training service providers from the public and private sectors. These modules have demonstrated the strength of the PPAP’s well-managed public-private partnership approach to rural development. The ToT topics include:

  • Cocoa best management practice, and cocoa quality by NGIP-Agmark Limited.
  • Safe chemical use & storage by Farmset Limited.
  • Farming as a business by the Kairak Vudal Resource Training Centre.
  • Financial literacy by Bank South Pacific Limited.
  • Governance of cooperatives delivered by the Kairak Vudal Resource Training Centre.
  • HIV/Aids awareness by Mustard Seed Global Incorporated.

All-weather market access

NGIP-Agmark operates 5 Buying Points that purchase wet and dry cocoa beans from smallholder farmers.

Market access for smallholder farmers is often difficult during wet weather, and usually extremely costly. NGIP-Agmark provides a nationwide network of Cocoa Buying Points in Maprik, Wewak, Madang, Lae, Popondetta, Kimbe, Kerevat, Kokopo, Warangoi, Rabaul, Kokopau, Arawa and Buin. Many of these operations have additional dry bean dealer depots attached to them; thereby taking the market to the farmers throughout PNG. The NGIP-Agmark branch network mainly purchases dry cocoa beans from smallholder farmers, with additional wet bean buying operations in East and West New Britain Provinces. Commercial Agronomists (CAs) can arrange for cocoa to be collected directly from growers using either a company vehicle or by arrangement on a community based vehicle.

NGIP-Agmark’s staffer – Felix Albert – manages the day-to-day operations at the Warangoi Buying Point in East New Britain Province.

“Lo wanpela dei mipela save kisim 12 to 30 beg dry bean, sapos cacao emi flush mipela isave kisim 45-50 beg lo wanpela dei. Wanpela beg imas 63.5 kg gross na igat tupela gred o kwaliti wantaim tupela preis. Tupela gred isave go lo Agmark yet.”

The Sikut Bridge has provided ‘partnership’ families with all-weather access to provincial markets, supplies and services.

Under Component 3, the Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) sets out to address critical market access issues faced by participating smallholder farmers. For example, the Sikut Bridge was recently constructed following a proposal by the NGIP-Agmark/ENB Smallholders partnership. The culvert bridge was designed by the Snowy Mountains Engineering Corporation (SMEC) in Australia, built by local company Kokopo Plant Hire and funded by PPAP. This impressive structure provides 33 ‘partnership’ families with all-weather access to essential services including Cocoa Buying Points. In addition, the bridge benefits numerous households from other ‘partnerships’ as well as non-participating communities.

Former Ward Member – Kim Tiken – lives a few kilometres inland from the Sikut Bridge. In 2013, he began replanting his cocoa block with 200 hybrid clone seedlings from PPAP. He has continued to replace his old cocoa trees, and now has around 1,000 hybrid cocoa clones which he looks after with his wife and children. The family has also recently set-up a cocoa fermentary and nursery. The Sikut bridge has really helped his family to market their local produce:

“Bipo taim nogat bris, taim blo ren em dispela wara isave tait, na mipela ino inap lo krosim. Sapos ol mama iredim maket ol ino inap lo kros, na kar tu ino inap lo kros, na ol mama istranded wantaim ol kaikai”.


Reviving cocoa is reviving human life (2)

Fabian Kada is the Spiritual Director for Shadowes Cocoa Reviver, as well as Catechist for the 5 Catholic Community Churches within Kabaira Parish.

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver have been working with the World Bank’s Productive Partnerships in Agriculture Project (PPAP) and its industry partner – NGIP-Agmark – to promote their motto “Reviving cocoa is reviving human life”.

From humble beginnings, this small “cluster group” of smallholder cocoa farmers in the Gazelle District of East New Britain Province now reaches out to 642 registered farmers from 3 Districts in 2 Provinces through the provision of high-quality, face-to-face services that are both demand driven and affordable.

Fabian Kada is the Spiritual Director for Shadowes Cocoa Reviver, as well as Catechist for the 5 Catholic Community Churches within Kabaira Parish.

“Sapos yu no planim kakao yu no inap lo givim ofa lo sios, na yu no inap lo paim skul fi. Dispela wok mi mekim em spiritual na physical tu. Mipela irivaivim wok blo growim kakao wantaim wok blo growim spiritual laip blo ol pipol tu. Sapos ol pipol ino wok lo kakao, ating em bai hat lo baim samting lo hausik o skul o treidsto!”

Church programs

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver continues to assist the Kabaira Catholic Parish and its 5 Communities with its ongoing maintenance and income generation programs. This includes:

  • Renovation of the 5 church buildings at Volavolo, Rasimen, Pakanakapiaka, Malivuan and Vunalaok through financial contributions and provision of qualified carpenters.
  • Rehabilitation of the 12 ha. cocoa plantation at Kabaira through provision of hybrid cocoa clones, training, field workers and ongoing support.

Education programs

Shadowes Cocoa Reviver has also assisted the Catholic Agency Schools and Vocational Centre operating in Kabaira Parish with their ongoing maintenance and income generation programs. This includes:

  • Renovation of double classroom at the Kabaira Elementary School through financial contributions and provision of qualified carpenters.
  • Renovation of double classroom and school hall at the Kabaira Primary School through financial contributions and provision of qualified carpenters.
  • Rehabilitation of the 7 ha. cocoa plantation at the Catholic Vocational Centre at Kabaira through provision of hybrid cocoa clones, training, field workers and ongoing support.
  • Rehabilitation of the 6 ha. cocoa plantation at the Kabaira Primary School through provision of hybrid cocoa clones, training and field workers and ongoing support.

Family programs

Fabian Kada – Spiritual Director for Shadowes Cocoa Reviver – is helping Shadowes Cocoa Reviver to revive both the physical and spiritual well-being of families within and beyond the Kabaira Ward.

“Nambawan samting we miplela ilukim we em i senisim sindaun blo ol pipol em kakao. Tasol em ihat lo stopim drug na homebrew sapos yu no konsentrait lo physical laip na spiritual laip tu. Olsem na Shadowes ilaik rivaivim wok blo growim kakao wantaim spiritual laip blo ol pipol”.

Comments are closed.